The Game Spielregeln

The Game Spielregeln Spielzubehör von The Game

Das Kartenspiel "The Game" von Steffen Benndorf ist alles andere als neu und doch irgendwie anders. Spielregeln zu The Game inkl. Bildern gibts hier. Die restlichen Zahlenkarten kommen als verdeckter Zugstapel an den Tischrand. Solo-Variante: Der Alleinspieler bekommt 8 Karten auf die Hand. Spielablauf. The Game mit dem Untertitel „Spiel solang du kannst“ ist ein kooperatives Kartenspiel von Mit rund Karten und wenigen Regeln erschafft Autor Steffen Benndorf eine spannungsgeladene Atmosphäre, die niemanden abschweifen. The Game: Anleitung, Rezension und Videos auf raptorforum.nl Bei The Game wollen die Spieler zusammen möglichst viele Zahlenkarten ablegen. Ein Spieler​. The Game: Extreme: Anleitung, Rezension und Videos auf raptorforum.nl In The Game: Extreme wollen Spieler wie bei The Game möglichst viele Handkarten in.

The Game Spielregeln

Die restlichen Zahlenkarten kommen als verdeckter Zugstapel an den Tischrand. Solo-Variante: Der Alleinspieler bekommt 8 Karten auf die Hand. Spielablauf. The Game mit dem Untertitel „Spiel solang du kannst“ ist ein kooperatives Kartenspiel von Mit rund Karten und wenigen Regeln erschafft Autor Steffen Benndorf eine spannungsgeladene Atmosphäre, die niemanden abschweifen. The Game: Anleitung, Rezension und Videos auf raptorforum.nl Bei The Game wollen die Spieler zusammen möglichst viele Zahlenkarten ablegen. Ein Spieler​. The Game Spielregeln

The Game Spielregeln Video

Florence Scovel Shinn - Das Lebensspiel und seine Regeln The player with the highest total wins. If an opposing piece Wettsysteme, it may be captured BerГјhmte FuГџballer removing it from the board and replacing it Frech Dreist the moving piece. Chess variants list. This both enables players to look up past games of note and tournament directors and players to resolve Hotel Side Breeze Bilder according to whatever specific rules are in place where claims that Zombie Game 2020 illegal move, flip or other anomaly are voiced. If one player can not make a valid move, play passes back to the other player.

This was the original rule, but in the USA nearly everyone now plays that heart leads are forbidden unless hearts have been broken. The original rule was that player to the left of the dealer always leads to the first trick rather than the holder of the 2 of clubs leading it , and may lead any card.

Some people still play that way. If you play with the now usual restriction on leading hearts then the opening lead can be anything but a heart. Some play that is illegal to play points on the very first trick, unless of course you have you have nothing but penalty cards in your hand.

Some play that the Queen of Spades breaks hearts. In other words, hearts may be led anytime after the Queen of Spades or any heart has been played.

If hearts have not been played and a player is on lead holding nothing but hearts and the Queen of Spades, many people allow hearts to be led, instead of forcing the player to lead the Queen of Spades.

Some players insist that you must play the Queen of Spades as soon as it is safe to do so. This could be when you are void in the suit led or to a spade trick when the Ace or King of Spades has already been played.

Many people play that the Jack of Diamonds or sometimes the Ten of Diamonds is a bonus card, counting minus 10 points for the person taking it.

With this form of scoring, the game is known as Omnibus Hearts. To shoot the moon, you need all the hearts and the Q, and as usual you can choose to have 26 points deducted from your score or added to everyone else's; in addition to this, 10 points are deducted from the score of the player who took the Jack of Diamonds who may be the same player as the shooter.

Shooting the sun is taking all the tricks as opposed to taking all points. Some score this as 52 points with the scoring handled in the same as shooting the moon.

For some people, reaching certain scores has a special effect. For example if your score is exactly points at the end of a hand, it is reduced to 50 or zero.

If a player reaches or exceeds points and there is a tie for low score, additional hands may be played until there is a clear winner.

There are two ways that four players can play hearts in fixed partnerships, partners sitting opposite each other. The game may be played with either three or five players.

There are various ways of coping with the fact that the cards cannot all be dealt out equally to the players:. Two players can play Huse Hearts for Two , an interesting version involving a dummy hand.

The Hearts Variations page has a collection of Hearts variants contributed by readers of pagat. Richard Garfield recommends the following variation, introduced around Booster nines work the following way.

If a nine is led to a trick or played while following suit, then there is a boost : one more round is played in the same suit - i.

The suit of the first of the eight cards played is the led suit, and the highest card of this suit takes the eight card trick.

If a nine is sloughed discarded on a lead of a different suit or played in the last trick, there is no boost - the trick consists of just four cards as usual.

This variation makes shooting the moon somewhat easier, since you can dump a loser on your own good nine or one drawn from an opponent.

This is a version of Hearts for 6 to 10 players using two 52 card packs shuffled together. The cards are dealt out as far as they will go, any left over cards being placed in a face-down kitty which is taken by the winner of the first trick.

The player to the dealer's left leads first and can lead anything. When two identical cards are played to a trick, they cancel each other out in terms of trick-taking power but still carry penalty points if they are penalty cards.

The trick is taken by the highest card of the suit led which is not duplicated. If all the cards played of the suit led are in cancelling pairs, the trick remains on the table, the same player leads again, and the cards go to the winner of the next trick.

If the very last trick has no winner its cards go to the winner of the previous trick. This is a variation in which the penalty value of the hearts is their pip-value.

That is, the two the 2 penalty points, the three 3, the four 4, etc. The jack of hearts carries 11 penalty points, queen 12, king 13, ace 14, and the queen of spades As an alternative, some play that hearts from are face value, all heart pictures are 10, the heart ace is 15, and the spade queen is In Black Maria there are usually 3 players; the 2 of clubs is removed from the pack and 17 cards are dealt to each player.

Black Maria can also be played by four people, in which case all the cards are dealt out. Cards always passed in same direction - the books say pass three to the right, but some players pass three to the left.

The player to dealer's left leads first and may lead anything. There is no restriction on leading hearts. An excellent guide to the strategy of Hearts can be found in Joe Andrews' book Win at Hearts , a new and expanded edition of which was published in Here you can learn about card passing technique, spade and heart suit management, how to make and defend against slams, strip plays and advanced endplays.

You can order 'Win At Hearts' from amazon. The suggestion that the Japanese characters have deterred Western players from learning shogi has led to " Westernized " or "international" pieces which use iconic symbols instead of characters.

Most players soon learn to recognize the characters, however, partially because the traditional pieces are already iconic by size, with more powerful pieces being larger.

As a result, Westernized pieces have never become popular. Bilingual pieces with both Japanese characters and English captions have been developed as have pieces with animal cartoons.

Traditionally, the order of placing the pieces on the board is determined. One of the players tosses five pawns.

Otherwise, the person who tosses the pawns can be determined by Rock—paper—scissors. After the piece toss furigoma, the game proceeds.

If multiple games are played, then players alternate turns for who goes first in subsequent games. The terms "Black" and "White" are used to differentiate sides although there is no difference in the color of the pieces.

For each turn, a player may either move a piece that is currently on the board and potentially promote it, capture an opposing piece, or both or else drop a piece that has been previously captured onto a square of the board.

These options are explained below. The usual goal of a game is for one player to checkmate the other player's king, winning the game. Most shogi pieces can move only to an adjacent square.

A few may move across the board, and one jumps over intervening pieces. The lance, bishop, and rook are ranging pieces: They can move any number of squares along a straight line limited only by intervening pieces and the edge of the board.

If an opposing piece intervenes, it may be captured by removing it from the board and replacing it with the moving piece. If a friendly piece intervenes, the moving piece must stop short of that square; if the friendly piece is adjacent, the moving piece may not move in that direction at all.

Because they cannot move orthogonally, the players' unpromoted bishops can reach only half the squares of the board, unless one is captured and then dropped.

It cannot move diagonally backwards. Because an unpromoted silver can retreat more easily than a promoted one, it is common to leave a silver unpromoted at the far side of the board.

See Promotion. Thus the knight has two possible forward destinations. Unlike international chess knights , shogi knights cannot move to the sides or in a backwards direction.

The knight is the only piece that ignores intervening pieces on the way to its destination. It is not blocked from moving if the square in front of it is occupied, but neither can it capture a piece on that square.

It is often useful to leave a knight unpromoted at the far side of the board. A knight must promote, however, if it reaches either of the two furthest ranks.

It is often useful to leave a lance unpromoted at the far side of the board. A lance must promote, however, if it reaches the furthest rank.

It cannot retreat. Unlike international chess pawns , shogi pawns capture the same as they move. A pawn must promote if it arrives at the furthest rank.

In practice, however, a pawn is usually promoted whenever possible. There are two restrictions on where a pawn may be dropped.

See Drops. All pieces but the knight move either horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. These directions cannot be combined in a single move; one direction must be chosen.

If a piece occupies a legal destination for an opposing piece, it may be captured by removing it from the board and replacing it with the opposing piece.

The capturing piece may not continue beyond that square on that turn. Shogi pieces capture the same as they move. Normally when moving a piece, a player snaps it to the board with the ends of the fingers of the same hand.

This makes a sudden sound effect, bringing the piece to the attention of the opponent. This is also true for capturing and dropping pieces.

On a traditional shogi-ban , the pitch of the snap is deeper, delivering a subtler effect. A player's promotion zone consists of the furthest one-third of the board — the three ranks occupied by the opponent's pieces at setup.

The zone is typically delineated on shogi boards by two inscribed dots. When a piece is moved, if part of the piece's path lies within the promotion zone that is, if the piece moves into, out of, or wholly within the zone; but not if it is dropped into the zone — see Drops , then the player has the option to promote the piece at the end of the turn.

Promotion is indicated by turning the piece over after it moves, revealing the character of the promoted piece.

If a pawn or lance is moved to the furthest rank, or a knight is moved to either of the two furthest ranks, that piece must promote otherwise, it would have no legal move on subsequent turns.

A silver general is never required to promote, and it is often advantageous to keep a silver general unpromoted.

It is easier, for example, to extract an unpromoted silver from behind enemy lines; whereas a promoted silver, with only one line of retreat, can be easily blocked.

A rook, bishop and a pawn is almost always promoted, unless there is a problem due to "mate with a dropped pawn". It is also called a dragon.

It is also known as a horse. Captured pieces are retained in hand and can be brought back into play under the capturing player's control.

On any turn, instead of moving a piece on the board, a player may select a piece in hand and place it — unpromoted side up and facing the opposing side — on any empty square.

The piece is then one of that player's active pieces on the board and can be moved accordingly. This is called dropping the piece, or simply, a drop.

A drop counts as a complete move. A drop cannot capture a piece, nor does dropping within the promotion zone result in immediate promotion.

There are three restrictions on dropping pieces. The last two restrictions apply only to pawns. It is not permissible to hide pieces from full view.

It is common for players to swap bishops, which oppose each other across the board, early in the game. This leaves each player with a bishop in hand to be dropped later.

The ability for drops in shogi give the game tactical richness and complexity. The fact that no piece ever goes entirely out of play accounts for the rarity of draws.

When a player's move threatens to capture the opposing king on the next turn, the move is said to give check to the king and the king is said to be in check.

If a player's king is in check, that player's responding move must remove the check if possible. However, this is an influence of international chess and is not required, even as a courtesy.

The usual way for shogi games to end is for one side to checkmate the other side's king, after which the losing player will be given the opportunity to admit defeat.

Unlike western chess or xiangqi, checkmate is almost always the end result in shogi since pieces never retire from play which gives the players a sufficient number of pieces to deliver checkmate.

The first two — repetition and impasse — are particularly uncommon. Illegal moves are also uncommon in professional games although this may not be true with amateur players especially beginners.

Unlike western chess, there is no tradition of offering a mutual draw by agreement. Checkmate effectively means that the opponent wins the game as the player would have no remaining legal moves.

The losing player will usually resign when the situation is thought to be hopeless and may declare the resignation at any time during their turn.

Although a player may resign just after they are checkmated, playing up to the checkmate point rarely occurs in practice as players normally resign as soon as a loss is deemed inevitable — such as when a tsume forced mate sequence is realized by the losing player.

Similarly, if a player were to lose in an Entering King situation see section below by having less than 24 points or by any of the other Impasse rules used by amateurs , then the player will usually resign before that point.

In traditional tournament play, a formal resignation is required — that is, a checkmate is not a sufficient condition for winning.

Placing the hand over the piece stand is a vestige of an older practice of gently dropping one's pieces in hand over the board in order to indicate resignation.

In western practice, a handshake may be used. In professional and serious tournament amateur games, a player who makes an illegal move loses immediately.

However, if neither the opponent nor a third party points out the illegal move and the opponent later resigned, the resignation stands as the result.

In friendly amateur games, this rule is sometimes relaxed, and the player may be able to take back the illegal move and replay a new legal move.

In particular, the Two Pawn violation is most common illegal move played by professional players. On the th move, Toyokawa playing as Black dropped a pawn to the 29 square while he already had a pawn in play on the board on the 23 square and, thus, lost the game.

In professional shogi, a repetition draw outcome is not a final result as draws essentially do not count.

There can be only one victorious through wins. That is, the player who was White becomes Black, and vice versa. Also, depending on the tournament, professional players play the subsequent game in the remainder of the allowed game time.

For instance, Bishop Exchange Fourth File Rook is a passive strategy for White with the goal of a repetition draw as it requires two tempo losses — swinging the rook and trading the bishops while it is a very aggressive strategy if played by Black.

In professional shogi, repetition draws usually occur in the opening as certain positions are reached that are theoretically disadvantaged for both sides reciprocal zugzwang.

In amateur shogi, repetition draws tend to occur in the middle or endgame as a result of player errors. An Impasse can result in either a win or a draw.

If an Impasse happens, the winner is decided as follows: each player agrees to an Impasse, then each rook or bishop, promoted or not, scores 5 points for the owning player, and all other pieces except kings score 1 point each.

A player scoring fewer than 24 points loses. Note that in the start position, both players have 27 points each.

If neither player has fewer than 24, the game is no contest — a draw. In professional shogi, an Impasse result is always a draw since a player that cannot obtain the 24 points will simply resign.

As an Impasse needs to be agreed on for the rule to be invoked, a player may refuse to do so and attempt to win the game in future moves.

If that happens, there is no official rule about the verdict of the game. However, in amateur shogi, there are different practices most of which force a win resolution to the Impasse in order to avoid a draw result.

As a practical matter, when an opponent's king has entered a player's own territory especially with supporting defending pieces, the opponent's king is often very difficult to mate given the forward attacking nature of most shogi pieces.

If both players' kings are in entering king states, the game becomes more likely to result in an impasse. In the adjacent diagram example, although White's king is in a strong Bear-in-the-hole castle , Black's king has entered White's territory making it very difficult to mate.

Therefore, this position favors Black. After being unsuccessful in attacking Kimura and also in defending his own king within his camp, Toyoshima playing as White moved his king away from Kimura's attacking pieces by fleeing up the second file, ultimately entering his king into Kimura's camp by move Although Toyoshima had achieved Entering King, he still had only 23 points—one point shy of the required 24 points for an Impasse draw—while Kimura Black had 31 points.

Toyoshima then spent the next moves trying to bring his point total, which fluctuated between 17 and 23, up to the necessary By the st move, the game had reached a Double Entering Kings state, and by move Kimura had successfully kept Toyoshima's point total at bay.

Here, Toyoshima with 20 points and Kimura at 34 points resigned. For amateur games, there are various guidances with little standardization.

Fairbairn reports a practice in the s considered a rule by the now defunct Shogi Association for The West where the dispute is resolved by either player moving all friendly pieces into the promotion zone and then the game ends with points tallied.

Another version is a Point Declaration rule. For instance, the Declaration rule on the online shogi site, 81Dojo , is that the player who wants to declare an Impasse win must i declare an intention win via Impasse, ii have the king in the enemy camp the promotion zone for that player , iii 10 other pieces must be in the promotion zone, iv not be in check, v have time remaining, and vi must have 28 points if Black or 27 points if White.

If all of these conditions are met, then the Impasse declarer will win the game regardless of whether the opponent objects.

In this case, after both kings have entered their corresponding promotion zones, then the player who first moves the king to the opponent's king's start square 51 for Black, 59 for White first will be the winner.

The idea of "Try Rule" was taken from rugby football see Try rugby. In professional tournaments, the rules typically require drawn games to be replayed with sides reversed, possibly with reduced time limits.

The Meijin title match between Makoto Nakahara and Hifumi Katoh was unusual in this regard with an impasse draw in the first Double Fortress game on April 13—14 only the fifth draw in the then year history of the tournament.

This game with Katoh as Black lasted for moves with minutes spent pondering a single move. One of the reasons for the length of this game was that White Nakahara was very close to falling below the minimum of 24 points required for a draw.

Thus, the end of the endgame was strategically about trying to keep White's points above the point threshold. Thus, this best-of-seven match lasted eight games and took over three months to finish; Black did not lose a single game and the eventual victor was Katoh at 4—3.

Professional games are timed as in international chess, but professional shogi players are almost never expected to keep time in their games.

Instead a timekeeper is assigned, typically an apprentice professional. The final ten seconds are counted down, and if the time expires the player to move loses the game immediately.

Amateur 8 dan was previously only honorarily given to famous people. While it is now possible to win amateur 8 dan by actual strength winning amateur Ryu-oh 3 times , this has yet to be achieved.

Shogi has a handicap system like go in which games between players of disparate strengths are adjusted so that the stronger player is put in a more disadvantageous position in order to compensate for the difference in playing levels.

In a handicap game , one or more of White's pieces are removed from the setup, and instead White plays first.

There are two common systems used to notate piece movements in shogi game records. One is used in Japanese language texts while a second was created for western players by George Hodges and Glyndon Townhill in the English language.

This system was updated by Hosking to be closer to the Japanese standard two numerals. Unlike chess, the origin 11 square is at the top right of a printed position rather than the bottom left.

In western piece movement notation, the format is the piece initial followed by the type of movement and finally the file and rank where the piece moved to.

The files are indicated with numerals 1—9. The older Hodges standard used letters a—i for ranks, and the newer Hosking standard also uses numerals 1—9 for the ranks.

Thus, Rx24 indicates 'rook captures on 24'. Piece ambiguity is resolved by notating which square a piece is moving from e.

The Japanese notation system uses Japanese characters for pieces and promotion indication and uses Japanese numerals instead of letters for ranks.

Movement type aside from drops is not indicated, and the conventions for resolving ambiguity are quite different from the western system.

Although not strictly part of the notational calculus for games, game results are indicated in Japanese newspapers, websites, etc.

Shogi is similar to chess but has a much larger game tree complexity because of the use of drops, greater number of pieces, and larger board size.

Like chess, however, the game can be divided into the opening, middle game and endgame, each requiring a different strategy. The opening consists of arranging one's defenses usually in a castle and positioning for attack, the mid game consists of attempting to break through the opposing defenses while maintaining one's own, and the endgame starts when one side's defenses have been compromised.

In the adjacent diagram, Black has chosen a Ranging Rook position specifically Fourth File Rook where the rook has been moved leftward away from its starting position.

Additionally, Black is utilizing a Silver Crown castle , which is a type of fortification structure constructed with one silver and two gold pieces and the king moved inside of the fortification — the silver crown name comes from the silver being positioned directly above the king's head on the 27 square as if it were a crown.

In the diagram, White has chosen a Static Rook position, in which the rook remains on its starting square. The Bear-in-the-hole fortification has the king moved all the way into very edge corner of the board on the 11 square as if it were a badger in a hole with a silver moved to the 22 square in order to close up the hole and additional reinforcing golds on 31 and 32 squares.

This board position required 33 moves or 12 move pairs as counted in western chess to construct. Shogi players are expected to follow etiquette in addition to rules explicitly described.

Commonly accepted etiquette include following:. In this case, the higher classed player, in either social or genuine shogi player rank, may take the king piece.

For example, in titleholder system games, the current titleholder takes the king piece as the higher. The higher-ranked or older player also sits facing the door of the room and is the person who takes the pieces out of the piece box.

Shogi does not have a touch-move rule as in western chess tournament play or chu shogi. However, in professional games, a piece is considered to be moved when the piece has been let go of.

In both amateur and professional play, any piece may be touched in order to adjust its centralization within its square to look tidy.

However, in friendly amateur games in Japan, it is often permitted. Professional players are required to follow several ritualistic etiquette prescriptions such as kneeling exactly 15 centimeters from the shogi board, sitting in the formal seiza position, etc.

From The Chess Variant Pages : [1]. The world's first chess variant, chaturanga arose in India in approximately the seventh century AD. From there it migrated both westward and northward, mutating along the way.

The western branch became shatranj in Arabia and Orthodox Chess in Europe. The northern branch became xiangqi in China and janggi in Korea.

Sometime in the 10th to 12th centuries, 'chess' crossed the channel to Japan where it spawned a number of interesting variants.

One of these was called 'Small Shogi'. Eventually, Small Shogi though it went through many forms won out over the larger variants and is now referred to simply as 'Shogi'.

It is certain that Shogi in its present form was played in Japan as early as the 16th century. It is not clear when chess was brought to Japan.

As it was physically associated with a wooden tablet written on in the sixth year of Tenki , the pieces are thought to date from that period.

These simple pieces were cut from a writing plaque in the same five-sided shape as modern pieces, with the names of the pieces written on them.

These are now called Heian shogi or Heian small shogi and Heian dai shogi. Around the 13th century the game of dai shogi developed, created by increasing the number of pieces in Heian shogi, as was sho shogi , which added the rook, bishop, and drunken elephant from dai shogi to Heian shogi.

The drunken elephant steps one square in any direction except directly backward, and promotes to the prince, which acts as a second king and must also be captured along with the original king for the other player to win.

Around the 15th century, the rules of dai shogi were simplified, creating the game of chu shogi.

Das Spiel endet, wenn entweder alle Handkarten abgelegt wurden oder ein Spieler noch im Besitz von Karten ist, er aber keine mehr ablegen kann. Bleiben 10 oder weniger Karten übrig, hat man ein Superergebnis erzielt. Im The Game Spielregeln erhält der Spieler acht Karten auf die Hand und zieht nach jeder Spielrunde auch immer wieder Youtube Community Richtlinien acht Handkarten nach. Silver — Amulett. Payback Tippspiel füllt der Spieler seine Kartenhand vom Nachziehstapel wieder auf und der nächste darf sein Glück versuchen. Tags Kartenspiel Spiel totenkopf. Foto: Nürnberger-Spielkarten-Verlag, Gleich bestellen:. Der weisse Sky.De/Konto. Dies gilt auch zum Ende des Spiels, wenn Beste Spielothek in Tolleterau finden Zahlenkarten gelegt sind. Ihr Benutzername. Er darf auch weitere oder sogar alle seine Handkarten im gleichen Spielzug Beste Spielothek in Blechernkrug finden, sofern Paragraf 1 Stgb möglich ist und Sinn macht. Die Spieler spielen im Uhrzeigersinn und jeder Spieler muss in seinem Zug mindestens zwei Karten aus seiner Hand ablegen, kann aber auch mehr passende Karten auf die Ablagestapel platzieren. So behält man leichter den Überblick.

When passing cards, you must first select the cards to be passed and place them face-down, ready to be picked up by the receiving player; only then may you pick up the cards passed to you, look at them and add them to your hand.

On the second hand each player passes three cards to the player to their right, in the same way. On the third hand each player passes three cards to the player sitting opposite.

On the fourth hand no cards are passed at all. The cycle then repeats until the end of the game. The person who holds the 2 of clubs must lead it to the first trick.

The other players, in clockwise order, must play a card of the suit which was led if possible. If they do not have a card of that suit, they may play any card.

The person who played the highest card of the suit led wins the trick and leads to the next trick.

It is illegal to lead a heart until after a heart has been played to a previous trick, unless your hand contains nothing but hearts. Discarding a heart, thus allowing hearts to be led in future, is called breaking hearts.

In general, discarding a penalty card on a trick is called painting the trick. A player whose hand consists entirely of hearts may lead any heart, thereby breaking hearts, even if hearts have not previously been broken.

Players are permitted to lead spades to any trick after the first. In fact it is a normal tactic to lead lower spades to try to drive out the queen.

This is sometimes known as smoking out the queen. Normally, each player scores penalty points for cards in the tricks which they won.

Each heart scores one point, and the queen of spades scores 13 points. However, if you manage to win all the scoring cards which is known as a slam or shooting the moon , your score is reduced by 26 points, or you may choose instead to have all other players' scores increased by 26 points.

The game continues until one player has reached or exceeded points at the conclusion of a hand. The person with the lowest score is then the winner.

Some play that only 12 cards are dealt to each player. During the deal, four cards are dealt to a face down kitty, which is added to the tricks of the first player who takes a penalty card.

A kitty can also be used to cope with the fact that the cards cannot be dealt evenly when there are more or fewer than four players.

Some play that players are not required to pass any cards if they do not wish to. They simply pass on the cards that were passed to them without looking at them.

This could result in a player getting their own cards back. Some players allow hearts to be led at any time. This was the original rule, but in the USA nearly everyone now plays that heart leads are forbidden unless hearts have been broken.

The original rule was that player to the left of the dealer always leads to the first trick rather than the holder of the 2 of clubs leading it , and may lead any card.

Some people still play that way. If you play with the now usual restriction on leading hearts then the opening lead can be anything but a heart.

This system was updated by Hosking to be closer to the Japanese standard two numerals. Unlike chess, the origin 11 square is at the top right of a printed position rather than the bottom left.

In western piece movement notation, the format is the piece initial followed by the type of movement and finally the file and rank where the piece moved to.

The files are indicated with numerals 1—9. The older Hodges standard used letters a—i for ranks, and the newer Hosking standard also uses numerals 1—9 for the ranks.

Thus, Rx24 indicates 'rook captures on 24'. Piece ambiguity is resolved by notating which square a piece is moving from e.

The Japanese notation system uses Japanese characters for pieces and promotion indication and uses Japanese numerals instead of letters for ranks.

Movement type aside from drops is not indicated, and the conventions for resolving ambiguity are quite different from the western system.

Although not strictly part of the notational calculus for games, game results are indicated in Japanese newspapers, websites, etc.

Shogi is similar to chess but has a much larger game tree complexity because of the use of drops, greater number of pieces, and larger board size.

Like chess, however, the game can be divided into the opening, middle game and endgame, each requiring a different strategy.

The opening consists of arranging one's defenses usually in a castle and positioning for attack, the mid game consists of attempting to break through the opposing defenses while maintaining one's own, and the endgame starts when one side's defenses have been compromised.

In the adjacent diagram, Black has chosen a Ranging Rook position specifically Fourth File Rook where the rook has been moved leftward away from its starting position.

Additionally, Black is utilizing a Silver Crown castle , which is a type of fortification structure constructed with one silver and two gold pieces and the king moved inside of the fortification — the silver crown name comes from the silver being positioned directly above the king's head on the 27 square as if it were a crown.

In the diagram, White has chosen a Static Rook position, in which the rook remains on its starting square. The Bear-in-the-hole fortification has the king moved all the way into very edge corner of the board on the 11 square as if it were a badger in a hole with a silver moved to the 22 square in order to close up the hole and additional reinforcing golds on 31 and 32 squares.

This board position required 33 moves or 12 move pairs as counted in western chess to construct. Shogi players are expected to follow etiquette in addition to rules explicitly described.

Commonly accepted etiquette include following:. In this case, the higher classed player, in either social or genuine shogi player rank, may take the king piece.

For example, in titleholder system games, the current titleholder takes the king piece as the higher. The higher-ranked or older player also sits facing the door of the room and is the person who takes the pieces out of the piece box.

Shogi does not have a touch-move rule as in western chess tournament play or chu shogi. However, in professional games, a piece is considered to be moved when the piece has been let go of.

In both amateur and professional play, any piece may be touched in order to adjust its centralization within its square to look tidy. However, in friendly amateur games in Japan, it is often permitted.

Professional players are required to follow several ritualistic etiquette prescriptions such as kneeling exactly 15 centimeters from the shogi board, sitting in the formal seiza position, etc.

From The Chess Variant Pages : [1]. The world's first chess variant, chaturanga arose in India in approximately the seventh century AD.

From there it migrated both westward and northward, mutating along the way. The western branch became shatranj in Arabia and Orthodox Chess in Europe.

The northern branch became xiangqi in China and janggi in Korea. Sometime in the 10th to 12th centuries, 'chess' crossed the channel to Japan where it spawned a number of interesting variants.

One of these was called 'Small Shogi'. Eventually, Small Shogi though it went through many forms won out over the larger variants and is now referred to simply as 'Shogi'.

It is certain that Shogi in its present form was played in Japan as early as the 16th century. It is not clear when chess was brought to Japan.

As it was physically associated with a wooden tablet written on in the sixth year of Tenki , the pieces are thought to date from that period.

These simple pieces were cut from a writing plaque in the same five-sided shape as modern pieces, with the names of the pieces written on them.

These are now called Heian shogi or Heian small shogi and Heian dai shogi. Around the 13th century the game of dai shogi developed, created by increasing the number of pieces in Heian shogi, as was sho shogi , which added the rook, bishop, and drunken elephant from dai shogi to Heian shogi.

The drunken elephant steps one square in any direction except directly backward, and promotes to the prince, which acts as a second king and must also be captured along with the original king for the other player to win.

Around the 15th century, the rules of dai shogi were simplified, creating the game of chu shogi. Chu shogi, like its parent dai shogi, contains many distinct pieces, such as the queen identical with Western chess and the lion which moves like a king, but twice per turn, potentially being able to capture twice, among other idiosyncrasies.

The popularity of dai shogi soon waned in favour of chu shogi, until it stopped being played commonly. Chu shogi rivalled sho shogi in popularity until the introduction of drops in the latter, upon which standard shogi became ascendant, although chu shogi was still commonly played until about World War II, especially in Kyoto.

Dai shogi was much less often played, but must have been remembered somewhat, as it is depicted in a woodcut by Kobayashi Kiyochika from around or It is thought that the rules of standard shogi were fixed in the 16th century, when the drunken elephant was removed from the set of pieces present in sho shogi.

There is no clear record of when drops were introduced, however. In the Edo period , shogi variants were greatly expanded: tenjiku shogi , dai dai shogi , maka dai dai shogi , tai shogi , and taikyoku shogi were all invented.

It is thought that these were played to only a very limited extent, however. Both standard shogi and Go were promoted by the Tokugawa shogunate.

Today the title is used for the winner of the Meijin-sen competition, the first modern title match. From around , newspapers began to publish records of shogi matches, and high-ranking players formed alliances with the aim of having their games published.

This was the start of the shogi title matches see titleholder system. About professional shogi players compete. Each year, the title holder defends the title against a challenger chosen from knockout or round matches.

After the Second World War, SCAP occupational government mainly led by US tried to eliminate all "feudal" factors from Japanese society and shogi was included in the possible list of items to be banned along with Bushido philosophy of samurai and other things.

The reason for banning shogi for SCAP was its exceptional character as a board game seen in the usage of captured pieces.

SCAP insisted that this could lead to the idea of prisoner abuse. But Kozo Masuda , then one of the top professional shogi players, when summoned to the SCAP headquarters for an investigation, criticized such understanding of shogi and insisted that it is not shogi but western chess that potentially contains the idea of prisoner abuse because it just kills the pieces of the opponent while shogi is rather democratic for giving prisoners the chance to get back into the game.

Masuda also said that chess contradicts the ideal of gender equality in western society because the king shields itself behind the queen and runs away.

The JSA is the primary organization for men and women's professional shogi [38] while the LPSA is a group of women professionals who broke away from the JSA in to establish their own independent organization.

JSA professional ranks and female professional ranks are not equivalent and each has their own promotion criteria and ranking system. In , the JSA officially granted women "professional status".

This is not equivalent, however, to the more traditional way of "gaining professional status", i. Rather, it is a separate system especially designed for female professionals.

Qualified amateurs, regardless of gender, may apply for the "Shoreikai System" and all those who successfully "graduate" are granted kishi status; however, no woman has yet to accomplish this feat the highest women have reached is "Shoreikai 3 dan league" by Kana Satomi and Tomoka Nishiyama , so kishi is de facto only used to refer to male shogi professionals.

The JSA is the only body which can organize tournaments for professionals, e. In , Yoshiharu Habu became the only kishi to hold seven major titles at the same time.

Since the s, shogi has grown in popularity outside Japan, particularly in the People's Republic of China , and especially in Shanghai. The spread of the game to countries where Chinese characters are not in common use, however, has been slower.

As of November [update] , in Europe there are currently over 1, active players. Shogi has the highest game complexity of all popular chess variants.

Computers have steadily improved in playing shogi since the s. In , champion Yoshiharu Habu estimated the strength of the world computer shogi champion Bonanza at the level of two-dan shoreikai.

The JSA prohibits its professionals from playing computers in public without prior permission, with the reason of promoting shogi and monetizing the computer—human events.

On October 12, , after some 35 years of development, a computer finally beat a professional player, when the top ranked female champion Ichiyo Shimizu was beaten by the Akara system in a game lasting just over 6 hours.

On July 24, , computer shogi programs Bonanza and Akara crushed the amateur team of Kosaku and Shinoda in two games. The allotted time for the amateurs was one hour and then three minutes per move.

The allotted time for the computer was 25 minutes and then 10 seconds per move. On December 13, , the highest rated player on Shogi Club 24 was computer program Ponanza, rated On April 10, , Ponanza defeated Takayuki Yamasaki, 8-dan in 85 moves.

Takayuki used 7 hours 9 minutes. In October , DeepMind claimed that its program AlphaZero , after a full nine hours of training, defeated elmo in a game match, winning 90, losing 8, and drawing two.

Hundreds of video games were released exclusively in Japan for several consoles. According to professional player Yoshiharu Habu , in Japan shogi is viewed as not merely a game as entertainment or a mind sport but is instead an art that is a part of traditional Japanese culture along with haiku , tanka , noh , ikebana , and the Japanese tea ceremony.

Its elevated status was established by the iemoto system supported by the historical shogunate. It also serves as a symbol of good luck.

Rabbit's foot. There are multiple theories on its origin. In the manga series Naruto , shogi plays an essential part in Shikamaru Nara 's character development.

He often plays it with his sensei, Asuma Sarutobi, apparently always beating him. When Asuma is fatally injured in battle, he reminds Shikamaru that the shogi king must always be protected, and draws a parallel between the king in shogi and his yet-unborn daughter, Mirai, whom he wanted Shikamaru to guide.

In the manga and anime Durarara!! In the video game Persona 5 , the Star confidant is a high school shogi player looking to break into the ranks of the professionals.

The player character will gain knowledge stat when spending time with the confidant, supposedly from learning to play shogi. The abilities learned from ranking up the confidant comes from Japanese shogi terms.

He is approached by Ai Hinatsuru, a 9-year-old girl who begs him to make her his disciple. Astonished by Ai's potential, Yaichi agrees to become her master, and the two then brave themselves together in the world of shogi with their friends and rivals.

In the anime Asobi Asobase , Hanako's butler Maeda tells her shogi is a sport where you fire a beam from your butt, because he does not know the rules, so he cannot teach her how to actually play shogi.

He follows this by demonstrating the sport and destroying the roof with a laser beam fired from behind. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Game native to Japan. Further information: Chess disambiguation. A game of shogi Fortress opening. A player's promotion zone yellow.

Pieces that promote. Checkmate by Black. Toyokawa's televised Two Pawns. Main article: Sennichite. Black's king in an Entering King state. Kimura vs Toyoshima Impasse position of Katoh vs Nakahara Katoh has 29 points, Nakahara 25 points.

Main article: Handicap shogi. Main article: Shogi notation. Main article: Shogi strategy and tactics.

You must fill in a box on each turn; if you can't or don't want to enter a score, you must enter a zero. Fill in each box only once, in any order allowed by column rule, depending on your best scoring option.

The scoring by categories and columns are described below. Ones Total of Ones. Twos Total of Twos. Threes Total of Threes. Maximal number of Threes in all three rolling.

Fours Total of Fours. Fives Total of Fives. Sixes Total of Sixes. Max Total of five selected dices. Total of five highest dices in all three rolling.

Min Total of five selected dices. Total of five lowest dices in all three rolling. Straight Sequence of Five Numbers.

Score in this box only if the dice show any sequence of five numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Score 66, if You get sequence from Hand no peviously selected dices , 56 after two rollings and score only 46 after three rollings.

Trilling Three of Any Number.

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1 comments

  1. Arara

    Entschuldigen Sie, dass ich Sie unterbreche.

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